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The impact of operational performance reviews (OPRs) on reported crime in Queensland

Abstract

This project evaluates the impact of the Queensland Police Service's version of COMPSTAT, a management strategy implemented in the United States in New York, which is designed to reduce, prevent and control crime. In Queensland they are known as 'Operational Performance Reviews' (OPRs), and the study examines the impact of OPRs on reported crime in the state and assesses whether or not the OPRs have led to any crime reductions across the 29 police districts. The report begins with a synopsis of the background literature that informs the research. In the second part of the report, the authors describe the data and data extraction and aggregation methods. The third section examines the state-wide impact of introducing OPRs in Queensland in 2001. Interrupted time series analysis is used to assess and isolate the direct impact OPRs had on different categories of crime across the state. In the fourth part of the report the authors examine the district-by-district impact of OPRs on different categories of crime by using a random-effects, mixed model to understand the district variations in crime as a result of introducing the OPRs. The report concludes with a discussion of the findings. (Introduction, edited.)

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